Thursday

 

 

Room X

Room X

Room X

Room X

Room X

Room X

9:00

Welcome

9:30

 The Aha! of Slicing

Ole Jepsen

Max: 40 
 Scrum Events that activate your Brain!

Evelien Acun-Roos

Max: 40 
 The Dark Side of Agile

Pierre Hervouet

Max: 30 
 Rejuvenate your meetings with Liberating Structures

Frederik Vannieuwenhuyse

Leadership Track

 Let’s make something for real!

Jan Salvador van der Ven
&
Willem Kleinenberg

Computer
Max: 100 

10:45

Coffee Break

11:15

 Help business prioritize the backlog.

Chris Verlinden
&
Marie Jacqmin

Max: 24 

Printable cards and explanation of SAFe City setup
  Surviving a legacy codebase: tactics and tools to keep the right path

Pietro Di Bello
&
Paolo D'Incau

Max: 60 
 Gamestorm your meeting

dimitri bauwens

Max: 32 
 Problem? What problem?

Ben Linders

Max: 24 

Leadership Track

Let’s make something for real!

CONTINUED

12:30

Lunch

13:30

Welcome

14:00

 Strategy Mapping Hands-on

Marc Evers
&
Willem van den Ende

Max: 25 
 Tame the technical debt beast and enjoy sustainable productivity with 3X

Philippe Bourgau

Max: 30 
 Don't walk in my shu(s)!

Xavier Rene-Corail

Max: 40 
 Thought sketching for Agile practitioners and beyond

Koen De keersmaecker
&
[email protected]

Max: 40 

Leadership Track

Let’s make something for real!

CONTINUED

15:15

Coffee Break

15:45

Strategy Mapping Hands-on

CONTINUED

 Introduction to Structural thinking

Johan Decoster

 Serious role-playing

Nicole Belilos

 How to make the best hamburgers

Sandra Warmolts
&
Jan-Willem Zijlstra

Max: 20 

Leadership Track

Let’s make something for real!

CONTINUED

17:00

Closing

17:45

Drinks at the bar (sponsored by Co-Learning)

19:00

Dinner (included in conference fee)

21:00

Evening program (divers activities to be announced later)

Legend
Technology and Technique
Customer and Planning
Intro's and Cases
Team and Individual
Process and Improvement
Other

Session descriptions

max
40

The Aha! of Slicing

Ole Jepsen

Trip over the truth about the importance of slicing requirements the right way from the start – so that planning and execution throughout the levels of the organization are based on delivering real value. In this session, participants will experience for themselves how easy it is to accept the "wrong" way to slice, and learn how to make real slices to break down the work from large to small into customer-focused deliveries. (There might even be cake involved…)

Goal of the session: Learn how to slice right so deliveries at every level in the organization are based on real value.
Intended audience: MariekeLeoBramGeorgesVincentJokeEllen
Session Type: 75 min experiential learning session

There are many wrong ways – and only one right way – to cut a layer cake. The right way is vertically from center and out in triangle pieces.

The same goes for requirements. Just like we want X-functional (full stack) teams, and just like we want something from each layer in the cake in each piece, we also want our requirements to be sliced so they contain all the nessacary elements from each layer in the stack in order to make a potential release.

In theory this is fairly easy to understand, but in real life our old habits gets in the way. We talk about epics and slices, but often our "slices" are not slices but layers or old-habit-waterfall activities.

This can lead to disasters with development initiatives that are running for months and months (sometimes even years) without delivering, demoing or getting feedback on anything.

In this session we will play with slicing, both real vertical slices and "slices" that are not really slices. There will be a contest and, of course, big prizes 🙂

Marieke  is part of a team that delivers product software on a regular basis and has started to use some agile techniques. She feels it doesn't really work in her situation. She hopes she can hear from real people in real teams how they have been practicing these things, and which problems occurred in their situation, and what kind of consequences that had for them.
Marieke

Leo has been around forever. He has seen everything, done everything. He wants to go to XP Days because he thinks it's an excellent opportunity to meet with a lot of young, smart and enthusiastic  people.
Leo

Bram has never missed an XP Days. Bram likes the XP Days because of the friendly and informal atmosphere. Every year he goes back to work from XP Days full of energy, with a bag full of new ideas and techniques.
Bram

Georges is a stressed project manager. He's heard that agile projects are more effective, more fun and rewarding.  He doubts if everything he's heard is true. But what if it is...?
Georges

Vincent is the IT manager of a large company. The CEO has asked him to propose a plan to increase the efficiency of his department by 10%  in the next two years. He comes to the XP Days to get a taste of what "agile" can offer him.
Vincent

Joke is a product manager for a succesful product company. Joke finds it hard to talk to the development team, to make them understand what she needs in the product. Joke hopes to meet some developers and other product managers who can help her and give her some tips.
Joke

Ellen is an agile coach. She wants to learn and share new ideas and experience of techniques that work. She comes to XP Days because of its friendly and collaborative atmosphere.
Ellen

Back to program


max
40

Scrum Events that activate your Brain!

An interactive session connecting Brain Science to the Scrum Events

Evelien Acun-Roos

Inspired by the 6 trumps of Sharon Bowmans’ Training From the Back of The Room, there will be an exploration on how one can use Brain Science to keep Scrum Events live, active and worthwhile.

To get the most out of the Scrum Events I tried a lot of things. I experimented with formats and setups. Did a Facilitator training and looked for interesting games and Sprint Retrospective formats. But I never looked further than that. Until I did the Training From the Back of The Room and was intrigued by how the brain works in a training and learning setting.

Learning more about the human brain she figured out one could also use Brain Science to keep the Scrum Events alive and worthwhile. For example, reserach shows that our brain 'disconnects' after 10 minutes when nothing changes. In a training setting you would use this knowledge to change the setting regularly or to make short exercises or chunks of information. In a Scrum event you could use this knowledge also. How? That's what we will discuss during this session.

In this session one will learn about neuroscience and how you can use it to activate your brain and make your Scrum Events alive and active.

Bring your Brain!

Goal of the session: To understand the 6 trumps and how you can apply them in your Scrum Events
Intended audience: Everybody involved in a Scrum Environment, a learning environment
Expected experience: No
Session Type: 75 min experiential learning session

Inspired by the 6 trumps of Sharon Bowmans’ Training From the Back of The Room, there will be an exploration on how one can use Brain Science to keep Scrum Events live, active and worthwhile.

To get the most out of the Scrum Events I tried a lot of things. I experimented with formats and setups. Did a Facilitator training and looked for interesting games and Sprint Retrospective formats. But I never looked further than that. Until I did the Training From the Back of The Room and was intrigued by how the brain works in a training and learning setting.

Learning more about the human brain she figured out one could also use Brain Science to keep the Scrum Events alive and worthwhile.

In this session one will learn about neuroscience and how you can use it to activate your brain and make your Scrum Events alive and active. We will also experiment with some of the ideas that the participants come up with.

Bring your Brain!

Jan is an experienced programmer. He comes to XP Days to get tips and tricks from experts and to learn about the latest trends in continuous integration and automated testing.
Jan

Marieke  is part of a team that delivers product software on a regular basis and has started to use some agile techniques. She feels it doesn't really work in her situation. She hopes she can hear from real people in real teams how they have been practicing these things, and which problems occurred in their situation, and what kind of consequences that had for them.
Marieke

Leo has been around forever. He has seen everything, done everything. He wants to go to XP Days because he thinks it's an excellent opportunity to meet with a lot of young, smart and enthusiastic  people.
Leo

Bram has never missed an XP Days. Bram likes the XP Days because of the friendly and informal atmosphere. Every year he goes back to work from XP Days full of energy, with a bag full of new ideas and techniques.
Bram

Philippe comes to XP Days because his boss told him to go. He doesn't really care, because going to this conference means that he will be away from the hectic chaos in the office for 2 days.
Philippe

Georges is a stressed project manager. He's heard that agile projects are more effective, more fun and rewarding.  He doubts if everything he's heard is true. But what if it is...?
Georges

Vincent is the IT manager of a large company. The CEO has asked him to propose a plan to increase the efficiency of his department by 10%  in the next two years. He comes to the XP Days to get a taste of what "agile" can offer him.
Vincent

Joke is a product manager for a succesful product company. Joke finds it hard to talk to the development team, to make them understand what she needs in the product. Joke hopes to meet some developers and other product managers who can help her and give her some tips.
Joke

Hank is a motivated and experienced software engineer cum system architect who spends his days knee deep in the quagmires of enterprise automation. He comes to the XP Days to share with and learn from like-minded colleagues.
Hank

Ellen is an agile coach. She wants to learn and share new ideas and experience of techniques that work. She comes to XP Days because of its friendly and collaborative atmosphere.
Ellen

Back to program


max
30

The Dark Side of Agile

Come, have Fun, share the best Agile anti patterns, discover the main Agile flawless

Pierre Hervouet

This is an interactive workshop on which the attendees will work on the anti-manifesto, generate the best set of anti patterns, and maybe discover some weaknesses in Agile…if it is possible.

Goal of the session: Have Fun, and throught sharing the main anti patterns, to disclose the main flawless of Agile
Intended audience: Marieke Leo Bram Georges Vincent Helen Joke
Expected experience: Mid to advances
Session Type: 75 min experiential learning session

This is an interactive workshop on which the attendees will work on the anti-manifesto, generate the best set of anti patterns, and maybe discover some weaknesses in Agile…if there are.

Inspiration:

The Situation Is Hopeless but Not Serious: The Pursuit of Unhappiness

Paul Watzlawick

Marieke  is part of a team that delivers product software on a regular basis and has started to use some agile techniques. She feels it doesn't really work in her situation. She hopes she can hear from real people in real teams how they have been practicing these things, and which problems occurred in their situation, and what kind of consequences that had for them.
Marieke

Leo has been around forever. He has seen everything, done everything. He wants to go to XP Days because he thinks it's an excellent opportunity to meet with a lot of young, smart and enthusiastic  people.
Leo

Bram has never missed an XP Days. Bram likes the XP Days because of the friendly and informal atmosphere. Every year he goes back to work from XP Days full of energy, with a bag full of new ideas and techniques.
Bram

Georges is a stressed project manager. He's heard that agile projects are more effective, more fun and rewarding.  He doubts if everything he's heard is true. But what if it is...?
Georges

Vincent is the IT manager of a large company. The CEO has asked him to propose a plan to increase the efficiency of his department by 10%  in the next two years. He comes to the XP Days to get a taste of what "agile" can offer him.
Vincent

Joke is a product manager for a succesful product company. Joke finds it hard to talk to the development team, to make them understand what she needs in the product. Joke hopes to meet some developers and other product managers who can help her and give her some tips.
Joke

Back to program


Rejuvenate your meetings with Liberating Structures

Introduce tiny shifts in the way you meet, plan, decide and relate to one another

Frederik Vannieuwenhuyse

Do your meetings suck? Are you attending either presentation-style meetings or free-format brainstorms? In this fully interactive session you’ll experience new ‘micro-structures’ to facilitate interactions, conversations, create shared understanding, … in small and large groups, in any kind of meeting or gathering.

Goal of the session: You will experience interactive techniques to engage and unleash a large group of people.
Expected experience: none
Session Type: 75 min experiential learning session

We value “individuals & interactions”.

“The most efficient and effective method of conveying information is face-to-face conversation.“

The conventional structures you know to organise how people routinely work together hold back inclusion and engagement. Conventional structures are either too inhibiting (presentations, status reports and managed discussions) or too loose and disorganised (open discussions and brainstorms) to creatively engage people.

In this fully interactive session you’ll experience new ‘micro-structures’ to facilitate interactions, conversations, create shared understanding, … in small and large groups, in any kind of meeting or gathering. This session will be successful when you know how to better facilitate interactions between individuals.

Back to program


max
100

Laptop

Let’s make something for real!

Creating a working product in ONE day!

Jan Salvador van der Ven
& Willem Kleinenberg

Expected experience: Everyone can contribute
Session Type: hands on coding/design/architecture session

Making something together is really cool and satisfying. We propose a special all-conference-long session where participants can make something. We envision a central location where you can go to during the conference just to let your hands do some work. It does not matter what your knowledge and experience is, everyone can contribute. This will be relaxing and useful at the same time!

We will arrange the basics: a working start project, CI, hosting, an available test laptop and an initial backlog. Everyone can contribute on their own computer. During the two days, we encourage participants to host small activities, like MOB-programming, TDD, review sessions, etc. Of course we will also have some of these activities ready ourselves. Regularly, we will demonstrate the working software.

We have three goals with this session:

– We build something valuable for use after the XP days

– We have fun building stuff during the days

– We learn from each other by building together

At the start, we do not know yet what the result is going to be, but we do have some criteria:

– We will build a nonprofit product, for example for the XP days organisation or education.

– Everyone should be able to contribute.

– We built it as working software

Back to program


max
24

Help business prioritize the backlog.

Lean-agile is about the effective creation of value. But how does business determine value?

Chris Verlinden
& Marie Jacqmin

IT should stop prioritizing. Help business and give them an easy way to prioritize features. Agile is all about generating value, so we had better get a good way to interact with business on how to determine that value and prioritize accordingly.

Goal of the session: Participants should get a better view on business value and on prioritization.
Intended audience: Ellen, Vincent, Georges, Joke, Philippe
Expected experience: No
Session Type: 75 min experiential learning session
Materials: Printable cards and explanation of SAFe City setup

The SAFe City Workshop will help two groups of people to better understand how they can improve the way they work.

Business people will experience how lean-agile prioritization is a simple approach to make a team agree on the work to be done first to bring more value sooner.

Agile team members will understand the prioritization. They will also experience how a team of teams can plan the work together, in a face to face approach.

The workshop brings to life how SAFe assists in better alignment or integration of business and IT.

What is it

The SAFe City Workshop is a workshop, highly interactive as well as fun. The participants experience core concepts in Lean-Agile and in the SAFe® model, instead of just learning about them.

In the first part participants will learn to prioritize at high level; the selected initiatives are elaborated into prioritized features in the second round. As SAFe/agile want to focus on the creation of Value, the different backlogs continuously need to be prioritized, so that available capacity and budget is used to generate the most value at the most appropriate time. SAFe uses the concept Cost of Delay in prioritization, so the work that costs more if delayed longer gets treated first.

The workshop is 'played' in groups of about 4 people, scoring cards and establishing priorities collaboratively. The workshop is engaging and has inspired a major customer to use the card-based approach in real life.

Philippe comes to XP Days because his boss told him to go. He doesn't really care, because going to this conference means that he will be away from the hectic chaos in the office for 2 days.
Philippe

Georges is a stressed project manager. He's heard that agile projects are more effective, more fun and rewarding.  He doubts if everything he's heard is true. But what if it is...?
Georges

Vincent is the IT manager of a large company. The CEO has asked him to propose a plan to increase the efficiency of his department by 10%  in the next two years. He comes to the XP Days to get a taste of what "agile" can offer him.
Vincent

Joke is a product manager for a succesful product company. Joke finds it hard to talk to the development team, to make them understand what she needs in the product. Joke hopes to meet some developers and other product managers who can help her and give her some tips.
Joke

Ellen is an agile coach. She wants to learn and share new ideas and experience of techniques that work. She comes to XP Days because of its friendly and collaborative atmosphere.
Ellen

Back to program


max
60

Surviving a legacy codebase: tactics and tools to keep the right path

Learn with us how good practices and effective tools can help you to improve your legacy code

Pietro Di Bello
& Paolo D'Incau

How can you regain control of a legacy codebase that doesn't express well the domain of the problem we want to solve? Let's tackle the code the XP way, let's live refactor the code in pair programming! Let's see how the codebase changes!

Goal of the session: The goal of our session is to share with others the way we deal with legacy code. We expect that people coming to our session will go back to work and try to apply some of the refactoring techniques we will show in order to improve their codebases. We will show actionable techniques supported by simple and effective tools. Our final goal is to support developers to write clean code that represents better the domain they it is trying to solve.
Intended audience: Bram, Jan, Marieke, Philippe, Vincent, Hank
Expected experience: We think that people from basic technical knowledge to experienced developers can benefit from this talk, but best level is mid to high though.
Session Type: 30 min hands on coding/design/architecture session

We will show you how to regain control of a legacy codebase written in Java. This codebase shows some classic design problems but more than that, badly expresses the domain of the problem we want to solve.

During the session we will tackle the code the XP way: it will be a live refactoring in pair programming; we will show how the quality and expressiveness of the code can be progressively improved if we apply some good development practices with the help of some effective tools.

Jan is an experienced programmer. He comes to XP Days to get tips and tricks from experts and to learn about the latest trends in continuous integration and automated testing.
Jan

Marieke  is part of a team that delivers product software on a regular basis and has started to use some agile techniques. She feels it doesn't really work in her situation. She hopes she can hear from real people in real teams how they have been practicing these things, and which problems occurred in their situation, and what kind of consequences that had for them.
Marieke

Bram has never missed an XP Days. Bram likes the XP Days because of the friendly and informal atmosphere. Every year he goes back to work from XP Days full of energy, with a bag full of new ideas and techniques.
Bram

Philippe comes to XP Days because his boss told him to go. He doesn't really care, because going to this conference means that he will be away from the hectic chaos in the office for 2 days.
Philippe

Vincent is the IT manager of a large company. The CEO has asked him to propose a plan to increase the efficiency of his department by 10%  in the next two years. He comes to the XP Days to get a taste of what "agile" can offer him.
Vincent

Hank is a motivated and experienced software engineer cum system architect who spends his days knee deep in the quagmires of enterprise automation. He comes to the XP Days to share with and learn from like-minded colleagues.
Hank

Back to program


max
32

Gamestorm your meeting

Tired of those life-sucking meetings with no solution in sight?

dimitri bauwens

We have a problem… So the natural response is to place a meeting in the calenders… The only result of that meeting will probably be a date for a next meeting…

Recognizable? Not anymore! With gamestorming techniques we won't allow this kinds of meetings anymore.

We'll explore the opportunities gamestorming has and perform some games ourselves. The problem will be a real life case

Goal of the session: explore Gamestorming and see it's benefits
Intended audience: marieke, leo, bram, georges, vincent, joke, hank, ellen
Expected experience: none
Session Type: 75 min experiential learning session

We have a problem… So the natural response is to place a meeting in the calenders… The only result of that meeting will probably be a date for a next meeting…

A lot of us are already everyday in such meetings. Meetings just for the sake of having meetings, no more!

We'll use multiple gamestorming techniques combined in one session (opening – exploring – closing) to reach a possible solution to a real life problem. The problem at hand is known already by me but will be a surprise until the conference.

Come on in and be surprised about the power of Gamestorming. Perhaps it changes your view on the way a meeting can be held.

Marieke  is part of a team that delivers product software on a regular basis and has started to use some agile techniques. She feels it doesn't really work in her situation. She hopes she can hear from real people in real teams how they have been practicing these things, and which problems occurred in their situation, and what kind of consequences that had for them.
Marieke

Leo has been around forever. He has seen everything, done everything. He wants to go to XP Days because he thinks it's an excellent opportunity to meet with a lot of young, smart and enthusiastic  people.
Leo

Bram has never missed an XP Days. Bram likes the XP Days because of the friendly and informal atmosphere. Every year he goes back to work from XP Days full of energy, with a bag full of new ideas and techniques.
Bram

Georges is a stressed project manager. He's heard that agile projects are more effective, more fun and rewarding.  He doubts if everything he's heard is true. But what if it is...?
Georges

Vincent is the IT manager of a large company. The CEO has asked him to propose a plan to increase the efficiency of his department by 10%  in the next two years. He comes to the XP Days to get a taste of what "agile" can offer him.
Vincent

Joke is a product manager for a succesful product company. Joke finds it hard to talk to the development team, to make them understand what she needs in the product. Joke hopes to meet some developers and other product managers who can help her and give her some tips.
Joke

Hank is a motivated and experienced software engineer cum system architect who spends his days knee deep in the quagmires of enterprise automation. He comes to the XP Days to share with and learn from like-minded colleagues.
Hank

Ellen is an agile coach. She wants to learn and share new ideas and experience of techniques that work. She comes to XP Days because of its friendly and collaborative atmosphere.
Ellen

Back to program


max
24

Problem? What problem?

Getting rid of impediments quickly and effectively

Ben Linders

If your organization wants to become agile and lean, your teams need to be able to handle impediments quickly and effectively.

In this game, you will practice how to recognize and analyze impediments, understand how they can hinder your team, and decide what can be done and who can take appropriate action by deploying agile and lean principles and good practices.

Goal of the session: Become more effective: Recognize impediments early and get rid of them before they become a major issue
Intended audience: Marieke, Leo, Bram, Philippe, Georges, Vincent, Ellen,
Expected experience: medium
Session Type: 75 min experiential learning session

An agile way of working doesn’t guarantee that there will be no problems. Most probably there will be; working agile will make them surface. Agile teams need skills to deal with impediments to be effective and be able to deliver and satisfy the needs of their customers and stakeholders.

Agile teams are self-organized, nobody will solve their problems for them. They can decide how they want to do their work. Having the authority to decide comes with a responsibility: you have to solve problems that the team is facing. You cannot rely on management to solve them for you. That may sound like a disadvantage, but it actually is an advantage since you are allowed to solve them in a way that is most suitable and effective for you.

The impediment game that we will play in this session will teach you the five steps for handling impediments effectively:

– recognizing impediments

– understanding how they are hindering the team

– find effective solutions to deal with them

– decide what to do and who can do it

– learn how to become more effective in dealing with impediments

The steps suggest that they have to be done after each other, which is often preferred in most situations. But this is not a waterfall process. Usually, the steps take little time, you can go through all steps within an hour (for instance by doing a retrospective) or in less time (e.g. doing the steps during your daily stand-up). If you are stuck in one step you can decide to proceed to the next one, but then be prepared to go back and repeat the steps once you have more information.

Benefits for attendees:

• recognize impediments and understand how they can hinder the team

• deploy agile and lean practices to deal with them

• learn how to become more effective in dealing with impediments

Come play the impediment game!

Marieke  is part of a team that delivers product software on a regular basis and has started to use some agile techniques. She feels it doesn't really work in her situation. She hopes she can hear from real people in real teams how they have been practicing these things, and which problems occurred in their situation, and what kind of consequences that had for them.
Marieke

Leo has been around forever. He has seen everything, done everything. He wants to go to XP Days because he thinks it's an excellent opportunity to meet with a lot of young, smart and enthusiastic  people.
Leo

Bram has never missed an XP Days. Bram likes the XP Days because of the friendly and informal atmosphere. Every year he goes back to work from XP Days full of energy, with a bag full of new ideas and techniques.
Bram

Philippe comes to XP Days because his boss told him to go. He doesn't really care, because going to this conference means that he will be away from the hectic chaos in the office for 2 days.
Philippe

Georges is a stressed project manager. He's heard that agile projects are more effective, more fun and rewarding.  He doubts if everything he's heard is true. But what if it is...?
Georges

Vincent is the IT manager of a large company. The CEO has asked him to propose a plan to increase the efficiency of his department by 10%  in the next two years. He comes to the XP Days to get a taste of what "agile" can offer him.
Vincent

Ellen is an agile coach. She wants to learn and share new ideas and experience of techniques that work. She comes to XP Days because of its friendly and collaborative atmosphere.
Ellen

Back to program


max
25

Strategy Mapping Hands-on

Explore strategy mapping using Wardley Maps

Marc Evers
& Willem van den Ende

Not sure where you or your company is going? Come and make some strategy maps to find direction!

We will do a hands-on exploration of strategy mapping (as introduced by Simon Wardley), where you will have the opportunity to learn more about your strategy and directions to take.

Goal of the session: Learn how to make better informed strategic decisions
Intended audience: Vincent, Joke, Leo, Georges
Expected experience: Any
Session Type: 150 min experiential learning session

Are you CTO wondering where your software product should go? Are you an independent consultant looking for a bit of strategic direction instead of just going with whatever comes by? Do you have an interesting side project you'd like to turn into a profitable product, but you don't know how? Join us to explore your terrain, feel the climate and get some new strategic insights you can start executing on the next day.

We have started exploring strategy maps as promoted by Simon Wardley – https://medium.com/wardleymaps . Strategy mapping is an activity that provides insight and direction to where you and your company are and what moves you can make. This enables you to make a pre-informed choice of where (not) to venture.

An important contribution of Wardley's strategy mapping is recognizing that everything is always evolving: every technology or solution starts out as a wild idea, a solution looking for a problem. Over time it moves to a custom built solution, then becomes a product, until it becomes a commodity. Each phase has different dynamics and means different decisions and different ways of making those decisions. You can't do anything about it, but you can take advantage of it.

The basics of strategy mapping look simple, but you only learn it by getting your hands dirty. We'll give you a brief introduction and then move on to applying the technique on topics you bring in!

Leo has been around forever. He has seen everything, done everything. He wants to go to XP Days because he thinks it's an excellent opportunity to meet with a lot of young, smart and enthusiastic  people.
Leo

Georges is a stressed project manager. He's heard that agile projects are more effective, more fun and rewarding.  He doubts if everything he's heard is true. But what if it is...?
Georges

Vincent is the IT manager of a large company. The CEO has asked him to propose a plan to increase the efficiency of his department by 10%  in the next two years. He comes to the XP Days to get a taste of what "agile" can offer him.
Vincent

Joke is a product manager for a succesful product company. Joke finds it hard to talk to the development team, to make them understand what she needs in the product. Joke hopes to meet some developers and other product managers who can help her and give her some tips.
Joke

Back to program


max
30

Tame the technical debt beast and enjoy sustainable productivity with 3X

How to avoid stress by managing technical debt through the product life cycle

Philippe Bourgau

Ward Cunningham explained that bad code is like (technical) debt : we get a boost at the moment we write it, we pay interests to workaround it, and we'll need to pay it back some day. Technical debt is also unforgiving : deal with it the wrong way and it will make you crawl under stress !

With 3X, Kent Beck explains that we should adapt our practices to the product lifecycle.

How can we benefit from this new insight to manage technical debt in the long term and reach sustainable productivity ? By the end of the session, we should have a better understanding of what is technical debt as well as concrete practices to manage technical debt.

Goal of the session: ideas and practices as how to deal with technical debt
Intended audience: Jan, Leo, Georges, Bram, Vincent, Joke, Hank, Ellen
Expected experience: 3y+
Session Type: 75 min discovery session

Ward Cunningham explained that bad code is like (technical) debt : we get a boost at the moment we write it, we pay interests to workaround it, and we'll need to pay it back some day. Technical debt is also unforgiving : deal with it the wrong way and it will make you crawl under stress !

In early stage startups, taking technical debt is often the only way to get things out fast enough ! Later down the road, there’s a real danger that it becomes a curse as it aggregates into a big ball of legacy code. It can also be a surprise, when a new joiner brings in a revolutionary way of doing things, and renders all existing code obsolete. It can even be an opportunity when developers and their domain experts unearth a domain refactoring breakthrough !

There is no one-size fits all to deal with all these situations. That’s exactly what Kent Beck, the father of eXtreme Programming, discovered when he joined Facebook. He went out with 3X, to make us think of where we are in the product life cycle, and explains that we should adapt our practices and principles accordingly.

How can we benefit from this new insight to manage technical debt in the long term and reach sustainable productivity ? By the end of the session, we should have a better understanding of what is technical debt as well as concrete practices to manage technical debt.

Jan is an experienced programmer. He comes to XP Days to get tips and tricks from experts and to learn about the latest trends in continuous integration and automated testing.
Jan

Leo has been around forever. He has seen everything, done everything. He wants to go to XP Days because he thinks it's an excellent opportunity to meet with a lot of young, smart and enthusiastic  people.
Leo

Bram has never missed an XP Days. Bram likes the XP Days because of the friendly and informal atmosphere. Every year he goes back to work from XP Days full of energy, with a bag full of new ideas and techniques.
Bram

Georges is a stressed project manager. He's heard that agile projects are more effective, more fun and rewarding.  He doubts if everything he's heard is true. But what if it is...?
Georges

Vincent is the IT manager of a large company. The CEO has asked him to propose a plan to increase the efficiency of his department by 10%  in the next two years. He comes to the XP Days to get a taste of what "agile" can offer him.
Vincent

Joke is a product manager for a succesful product company. Joke finds it hard to talk to the development team, to make them understand what she needs in the product. Joke hopes to meet some developers and other product managers who can help her and give her some tips.
Joke

Hank is a motivated and experienced software engineer cum system architect who spends his days knee deep in the quagmires of enterprise automation. He comes to the XP Days to share with and learn from like-minded colleagues.
Hank

Ellen is an agile coach. She wants to learn and share new ideas and experience of techniques that work. She comes to XP Days because of its friendly and collaborative atmosphere.
Ellen

Back to program


max
40

Don't walk in my shu(s)!

Discover a common pattern of large scale agile failure, and what are the key drivers to overcome it.

Xavier Rene-Corail

You want to adopt agility in a large scale setup? You might ask someone who already succeeded, and just walk in his/her shoes. Just repeat the successful experience. WRONG. You will certainly experience some improvements at first, then fail in the long run.

Want to know why? Because repeating recipes cannot work in complex systems.

Let's discover together the drivers of an alternative approach. I'll share mine, from my experience, you'll share yours!

Goal of the session: A step back from the agile frameworks to the core principles of agility; a very quick overview of the Complex systems theory; a return on experience on large scale Agile deployment, from the presenter but also from the audience; some practices to overcome the announced failures, from the group work.
Intended audience: Marieke, Leo, Bram, Philippe, Georges, Vincent, Joke, Hank, Ellen
Session Type: 75 min discovery session

When big companies try to implement large scale agile frameworks, they often follow blindly Agile frameworks and recipes, and miserably fail at being sustainably agile. Let's try to explain why it fails, and imagine how to do differently!

From my return on experience of applying SAFe in a big company, but also from the audience ones, we will visit exemple of failures when one just tries to copy / paste a recipe, a "best practice", and hope it will magically work. In martial arts, the "Shu" is the phase where the learner practices and repeats the traditional movements and techniques. This is a necessary phase, but you must not stay forever someone else's "shu(s)".

With a quick overview of the Complexity theory and Dave Snowden's Cynefin framework, we'll explain why this approach will give a first impression of success, but will never work sustainably. You can only expect the same result for the same action in a deterministic system, not from a complex system, where the unpredictable human comes in …

What are the main drivers that will help a company to overcome this fatality? How wan we in practice use these drivers to avoid these failures? I will share my ideas, then we'll collectively, using Liberating Structures, find 10 more ideas.

Marieke  is part of a team that delivers product software on a regular basis and has started to use some agile techniques. She feels it doesn't really work in her situation. She hopes she can hear from real people in real teams how they have been practicing these things, and which problems occurred in their situation, and what kind of consequences that had for them.
Marieke

Leo has been around forever. He has seen everything, done everything. He wants to go to XP Days because he thinks it's an excellent opportunity to meet with a lot of young, smart and enthusiastic  people.
Leo

Bram has never missed an XP Days. Bram likes the XP Days because of the friendly and informal atmosphere. Every year he goes back to work from XP Days full of energy, with a bag full of new ideas and techniques.
Bram

Philippe comes to XP Days because his boss told him to go. He doesn't really care, because going to this conference means that he will be away from the hectic chaos in the office for 2 days.
Philippe

Georges is a stressed project manager. He's heard that agile projects are more effective, more fun and rewarding.  He doubts if everything he's heard is true. But what if it is...?
Georges

Vincent is the IT manager of a large company. The CEO has asked him to propose a plan to increase the efficiency of his department by 10%  in the next two years. He comes to the XP Days to get a taste of what "agile" can offer him.
Vincent

Joke is a product manager for a succesful product company. Joke finds it hard to talk to the development team, to make them understand what she needs in the product. Joke hopes to meet some developers and other product managers who can help her and give her some tips.
Joke

Hank is a motivated and experienced software engineer cum system architect who spends his days knee deep in the quagmires of enterprise automation. He comes to the XP Days to share with and learn from like-minded colleagues.
Hank

Ellen is an agile coach. She wants to learn and share new ideas and experience of techniques that work. She comes to XP Days because of its friendly and collaborative atmosphere.
Ellen

Back to program


max
40

Thought sketching for Agile practitioners and beyond

Visualize your thoughts and make impact

Koen De keersmaecker
& [email protected]

During this session – let's start thinking with our pen. No matter how convoluted a problem may feel in your head – simply pick up a pen and make the first stroke – the rest usually takes care of itself. I bet you will like it!

Goal of the session: Experience the power of thought sketching and got interested to learn more about it
Intended audience: Vincent, Ellen, Hank, Joke, Georges, Philippe, Bram, Leo, Marieke, Jan
Expected experience: from novel to experienced
Session Type: 75 min discovery session

Visualisation and visual facilitation is a (new) method to make content and process visible in realtime. Be it in presentations, workshops, coaching sessions, trainings and meetings – whenever people engage in dialogue, are working together and want to learn from each other in an impactful way. Bikablo is the brand that opens the door to the world of visual thinking and dialogue.

If you are (still) convinced that you are not at all talented and still would like to learn how to visualize, you have little experience with visualization so far and are looking for an easy way to improve your flip charts and make them more clear, attractive, and lively or you want to take your first steps into the world of visual facilitation and storytelling this session is definitely something you will never forget.

— Get an intro about how to Present, Document and Explore Visually —

This session will be very interactive and aims at people with all different backgrounds and experience levels (after all visualization is useful for everybody).

Got you intrigued? Click on the link and look what you will be up to after the session …

Not convinced yet? Click on the link and we'll talk again …

Or … You just wanna see the session's proposal visual?

Click the link: https://www.bizzuals.com/xpdays18

Jan is an experienced programmer. He comes to XP Days to get tips and tricks from experts and to learn about the latest trends in continuous integration and automated testing.
Jan

Marieke  is part of a team that delivers product software on a regular basis and has started to use some agile techniques. She feels it doesn't really work in her situation. She hopes she can hear from real people in real teams how they have been practicing these things, and which problems occurred in their situation, and what kind of consequences that had for them.
Marieke

Leo has been around forever. He has seen everything, done everything. He wants to go to XP Days because he thinks it's an excellent opportunity to meet with a lot of young, smart and enthusiastic  people.
Leo

Bram has never missed an XP Days. Bram likes the XP Days because of the friendly and informal atmosphere. Every year he goes back to work from XP Days full of energy, with a bag full of new ideas and techniques.
Bram

Philippe comes to XP Days because his boss told him to go. He doesn't really care, because going to this conference means that he will be away from the hectic chaos in the office for 2 days.
Philippe

Georges is a stressed project manager. He's heard that agile projects are more effective, more fun and rewarding.  He doubts if everything he's heard is true. But what if it is...?
Georges

Vincent is the IT manager of a large company. The CEO has asked him to propose a plan to increase the efficiency of his department by 10%  in the next two years. He comes to the XP Days to get a taste of what "agile" can offer him.
Vincent

Joke is a product manager for a succesful product company. Joke finds it hard to talk to the development team, to make them understand what she needs in the product. Joke hopes to meet some developers and other product managers who can help her and give her some tips.
Joke

Hank is a motivated and experienced software engineer cum system architect who spends his days knee deep in the quagmires of enterprise automation. He comes to the XP Days to share with and learn from like-minded colleagues.
Hank

Ellen is an agile coach. She wants to learn and share new ideas and experience of techniques that work. She comes to XP Days because of its friendly and collaborative atmosphere.
Ellen

Back to program


Introduction to Structural thinking

Why change efforts fail or succeed over time

Johan Decoster

Structural Thinking is a discipline in which underlying structure is explored, evaluated from the standpoint of effectiveness, and changed to support desired end results. Often, small changes in a structure cause major changes in a person's life and organization. These changes, in turn, create a rapid and permanent shift from ineffective behavior to highly effective behavior. The outcome is an enhanced ability to create ther desired end result. This is a method of consulting that gets to the true reality of a situation.

Goal of the session: – Understand what structure is and how this plays out in our life and organizations. – Learn the difference between a reactive orientation and a creative orientation in life.- Learn what structural conflict is.- Understand the problem of problem solving- Learn to create a structural tension chart- Discuss how S3 can help you build structures for sustainable agility at scale.
Intended audience: Leo, Bram, Philippe, Georges, Vincent, Joke, Hank, Ellen
Expected experience: no
Session Type: 75 min experiential learning session

Are you involved in adopting an Agile way of working into an organisation?

Have you noticed that sometimes the change lasts and other times, after some initial success, the change is reverted?

Do you talk sometimes about resistance, organisational gravity pulling you back, unwillingness, people not getting it etc.?

Well, you're in fight that you simply can not win. And the harder you try, the harder it – the system – will push back. And that's because the underlying structure of the organization can only reject the well meant change. It's not personal, it's not about your skills or competences.

It's simple, without a change of underlying structure, any change effort will eventually fail, and the organization will revert back to its previous behavior.

You might have noticed this when companies oscillate between centralized and decentralized decision making, between investments and cutting costs, between change and continuity, …

In this session we will introduce you to structural thinking and how this plays out in our organizations, especially in adopting Agile.

We will talk about a couple of aspects that are part of a structure: our mental models, our aspirations and values, shared vision and shared structural tension. Once you become aware of these elements it becomes easier to see how they are at play in your work.

Leo has been around forever. He has seen everything, done everything. He wants to go to XP Days because he thinks it's an excellent opportunity to meet with a lot of young, smart and enthusiastic  people.
Leo

Bram has never missed an XP Days. Bram likes the XP Days because of the friendly and informal atmosphere. Every year he goes back to work from XP Days full of energy, with a bag full of new ideas and techniques.
Bram

Philippe comes to XP Days because his boss told him to go. He doesn't really care, because going to this conference means that he will be away from the hectic chaos in the office for 2 days.
Philippe

Georges is a stressed project manager. He's heard that agile projects are more effective, more fun and rewarding.  He doubts if everything he's heard is true. But what if it is...?
Georges

Vincent is the IT manager of a large company. The CEO has asked him to propose a plan to increase the efficiency of his department by 10%  in the next two years. He comes to the XP Days to get a taste of what "agile" can offer him.
Vincent

Joke is a product manager for a succesful product company. Joke finds it hard to talk to the development team, to make them understand what she needs in the product. Joke hopes to meet some developers and other product managers who can help her and give her some tips.
Joke

Hank is a motivated and experienced software engineer cum system architect who spends his days knee deep in the quagmires of enterprise automation. He comes to the XP Days to share with and learn from like-minded colleagues.
Hank

Ellen is an agile coach. She wants to learn and share new ideas and experience of techniques that work. She comes to XP Days because of its friendly and collaborative atmosphere.
Ellen

Back to program


Serious role-playing

Improve your trainings with role-playing done right!

Nicole Belilos

Have you ever tried to do some role-playing in your training or coaching?

Was it effective?

Good role playing is a combination of acting, training and coaching. It’s about understanding the other person, empathy, giving feedback, and allowing the other to grow.

Come and learn how to do role-playing well!

Goal of the session: After this session trainers and coaches will know how to use role-playing in an effective way.
Intended audience: Ellen, Bram and anyone else wanting to improve the way they give trainings
Expected experience: No specific knowledge needed. Willingness to act / play is necessary.
Session Type: 75 min experiential learning session

Have you ever tried to do some role-playing in your training or coaching?

Did you see the fear in your participants’ eyes?

How did it go? How did you follow up?

And was it effective? Or just funny? Or a real disaster?

Role-playing can a great tool for trainers. However, often it is not done well. Just saying ‘Hey, you play the bossy Product Owner, and you play the shy Team Member’, is not enough. It might just make things worse.

Role playing in trainings is not about being a comedian. Good role playing is a combination of acting, training and coaching. It’s about understanding the other person, empathy, giving feedback, and allowing the other to grow.

In this session you will get an introduction to the training actor's toolbox. How to prepare for the role, how to get into the role, common mistakes to be aware of while playing, and different ways to give feedback to the participant. Part of the session will be theory, and in the other part you will get to try it out yourself.

Come and learn how to do role-playing well and to add it to your training / coaching toolkit.

You should not be afraid of acting!

And I promise it, we will have fun too.

Note: I have been trained by Arianda Schepens, www.hebbesacademy.nl.

(Note to reviewers: I might add another presenter to this session, so we can show the trainer / actor model better)

Jan is an experienced programmer. He comes to XP Days to get tips and tricks from experts and to learn about the latest trends in continuous integration and automated testing.
Jan

Marieke  is part of a team that delivers product software on a regular basis and has started to use some agile techniques. She feels it doesn't really work in her situation. She hopes she can hear from real people in real teams how they have been practicing these things, and which problems occurred in their situation, and what kind of consequences that had for them.
Marieke

Leo has been around forever. He has seen everything, done everything. He wants to go to XP Days because he thinks it's an excellent opportunity to meet with a lot of young, smart and enthusiastic  people.
Leo

Bram has never missed an XP Days. Bram likes the XP Days because of the friendly and informal atmosphere. Every year he goes back to work from XP Days full of energy, with a bag full of new ideas and techniques.
Bram

Philippe comes to XP Days because his boss told him to go. He doesn't really care, because going to this conference means that he will be away from the hectic chaos in the office for 2 days.
Philippe

Georges is a stressed project manager. He's heard that agile projects are more effective, more fun and rewarding.  He doubts if everything he's heard is true. But what if it is...?
Georges

Vincent is the IT manager of a large company. The CEO has asked him to propose a plan to increase the efficiency of his department by 10%  in the next two years. He comes to the XP Days to get a taste of what "agile" can offer him.
Vincent

Joke is a product manager for a succesful product company. Joke finds it hard to talk to the development team, to make them understand what she needs in the product. Joke hopes to meet some developers and other product managers who can help her and give her some tips.
Joke

Hank is a motivated and experienced software engineer cum system architect who spends his days knee deep in the quagmires of enterprise automation. He comes to the XP Days to share with and learn from like-minded colleagues.
Hank

Ellen is an agile coach. She wants to learn and share new ideas and experience of techniques that work. She comes to XP Days because of its friendly and collaborative atmosphere.
Ellen

Back to program


max
20

How to make the best hamburgers

With component or feature teams

Sandra Warmolts
& Jan-Willem Zijlstra

We will bake hamburgers with four teams; first round with 4 component teams, second round 4 feature teams. What happens to the delivery rate of the hamburgers to the customers when using component teams or feature teams. And how does the delivery rate and customer and employee satisfaction be affected when management decides to give priority to only one of the four products (either McDonalds, or Burger King or Wendy's or Five Guy's). Find out yourself by baking delicious hamburgers in our XP-days-kitchen.

Goal of the session: Experiencing how prioritizing of one product above others affect delivery rate, when using component teams and feature teams respectively
Intended audience: Jan, Marieke, Bram, Georges, Vincent, Joke, Hank, Ellen
Session Type: 75 min experiential learning session

McDonalds, Wendy's, Burger King and Five Guy's sell you the best hamburgers at XP-days. They all use one and the same kitchen. And you will be working in that kitchen baking burgers, baking bread, garnishing burgers or making containers. Or you can be one of the store managers and distribute the orders taken from people at XP-days to your team(s). Who doesn't want to wear the funny McDonalds crew hat? This is your change.

In the kitchen we will work in component and in feature teams. But of course, when everything is running smoothly, executive management comes rushing in, demanding change in priority, without asking us. But we will stand and deliver the best hamburgers ever anyway!

What will each situation do to the order delivery rate? And to the store manager's satisfaction? And the employee satisfaction? Find out by yourself and step into our kitchen. Let's bake !

Jan is an experienced programmer. He comes to XP Days to get tips and tricks from experts and to learn about the latest trends in continuous integration and automated testing.
Jan

Marieke  is part of a team that delivers product software on a regular basis and has started to use some agile techniques. She feels it doesn't really work in her situation. She hopes she can hear from real people in real teams how they have been practicing these things, and which problems occurred in their situation, and what kind of consequences that had for them.
Marieke

Bram has never missed an XP Days. Bram likes the XP Days because of the friendly and informal atmosphere. Every year he goes back to work from XP Days full of energy, with a bag full of new ideas and techniques.
Bram

Georges is a stressed project manager. He's heard that agile projects are more effective, more fun and rewarding.  He doubts if everything he's heard is true. But what if it is...?
Georges

Vincent is the IT manager of a large company. The CEO has asked him to propose a plan to increase the efficiency of his department by 10%  in the next two years. He comes to the XP Days to get a taste of what "agile" can offer him.
Vincent

Joke is a product manager for a succesful product company. Joke finds it hard to talk to the development team, to make them understand what she needs in the product. Joke hopes to meet some developers and other product managers who can help her and give her some tips.
Joke

Hank is a motivated and experienced software engineer cum system architect who spends his days knee deep in the quagmires of enterprise automation. He comes to the XP Days to share with and learn from like-minded colleagues.
Hank

Ellen is an agile coach. She wants to learn and share new ideas and experience of techniques that work. She comes to XP Days because of its friendly and collaborative atmosphere.
Ellen

Back to program


Presenters

Ole Jepsen

Ole is the founder of goAgile and a highly esteemed Agile facilitator and mentor for organizations looking to lead change. Using his expertise in Agile methodologies, Ole shows how gaining varying perspectives and sharing experiences brings about the best ideas that can be used throughout the organization.

Ole is a founder of the Agile Leadership Network (ALN), having started the “Learning and Recognition” Committee—working on defining and implementing a three-level certification program for great Agile Project Leaders. Ole is the founder and leader of the Danish Agile User Group – and he is active in the international agile community, speaking at conferences and consulting worldwide. Ole is also a Certified StrategicPlay® Facilitator with LEGO® SERIOUS PLAY™.



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Evelien Acun-Roos

Website: http://www.evelienroos.nl

Twitter: @evelienroos2

Evelien Acun-Roos is an experienced Agile Coach at Xebia and a Professional Scrum Trainer at Scrum.org. She has helped many teams at different organizations to become more Agile (ING, Rabobank, Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam, APG, Philips, Vodafone/Ziggo). She likes to focus on the Scrum Teams and the people the team consists of. Evelien loves starting up new teams and to support teams to become high performing.

Evelien loves to give training for beginning as well as experienced Scrummers. Her training courses are filled with brain based learning activities. In her classes she lets the learner learn instead of the teacher teach.

She is also the Scrum Master of the Scrum Master Cluster within Xebia, helping other Scrum Masters to become better Scrum Masters.



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Pierre Hervouet

Website: https://www.facebook.com/agilelebanon

Twitter: @agilelebanon

Pierre Hervouet is the founder of Agile Lebanon and has been an active promoter of agile methodologies since 2009.

He has over 25 years of professional experience, where he addressed all dimensions of the software industry; from business analysis to development, implementation and project management, as well as, sales and marketing.

He worked in Paris, and then moved to Lebanon 2001, where he worked at Khatib & Alami, one of the major Lebanese engineering company. He held the post of manager of the Business Performance & Business Development departments until July 2012.

It is after the XP days 2009 in Paris, that he started his journey in Agile.

Since then, he has implemented Agile methodologies with his 2 teams at K&A, and later, as a consultant in different Lebanese companies.



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Frederik Vannieuwenhuyse

Frederik Vannieuwenhuyse

Website: http://value-first.be

Twitter: vfrederik

I'm on a personal mission to transform organizations and the workplace and bring them into the 21th century, using modern-day (new) ways of working and leadership. Honestly, I am on a continuous discovery & exploration how to create a happy, productive, creative workplace where everybody feels good!

If you want to know more about my background, studies, certifications, experiences, interests … connect with me on http://linkedin.com/in/frederikvannieuwenhuyse/

Happy to listen to you and reflect! How can I help you, today?

Frederik is also XP Days Benelux co-organizer and event organizer at the Agile Belgium meetup. Frederik also likes to facilitate open space events and advice organizations on Lean Startup.



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Jan Salvador van der Ven

Jan Salvador van der Ven

Website: http://jansalvador.nl

Twitter: @salvadorven

Jan works as a trainer and coach for teams developing software. With a software engineering education, he has a thorough understanding of the whole development process of software. Next to his businesses, he also teaches at the university of Groningen on software startups and works on his PhD on software architecture. He is cofounder of Groningen Programmeert, a non-profit organisation that helps primary schools to teach programming.

In his free time he likes to run, hike, 3d-print, drink a beer or play with his two daughters.



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Willem Kleinenberg

Willem Kleinenberg

Website: http://www.duo.nl

Willem works as a Product Owner at Dienst Uitvoering Onderwijs (DUO), the Education Executive Agency of the Dutch Ministry of Education, Culture and Science. He has experience as a tester and Scrum Master in software development teams.

In his leasure time he likes gardening, playing games and drinking beers.



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Chris Verlinden

Chris Verlinden

Website: http://www.adjugo.com

Chris has a long career in IT, with a particular interest in software development, process improvement and business and IT alignment.

As one of the pioneers of agile software development in Belgium, I am very interested in the recent trend of agile-lean.

I am certified Scaled Agile Program Consultant.



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Marie Jacqmin

Marie Jacqmin

Website: http://www.adjugo.com

Hello, my name is Marie,

I had been working for a while in agility and using scrum without naming it… when I was introduced to the movement by Chris and Karen @ Adjugo.

Got totally taken by the virus and had the chance to follow various amazing trainings, now looking forward to sharing visions and experiences on the matter. For me it’s about having fun and finding the right flow in your work, make ‘priority’ sound funky, getting things done the right way, everybody feeling at the right place.

On the side, I’m also taking care of the drawings for our sessions, that’s fun!



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Pietro Di Bello

Pietro Di Bello

Website: https://about.me/pietrodibello

Twitter: @pierodibello

I am a passionate coder, I like to build products that can change the life of people.

I am a coach and a trainer, I feel proud when I can help my teammates to become greater every day at their job.

I am an agile developer, I try to embody the agile and lean principles in my professional life.



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Paolo D'Incau

Paolo D'Incau

Website: http://xpeppers.com

Twitter: @pdincau

I am an Italian agile software developer who loves coding and solving difficult problems in a simple way.

I discovered the Agile Manifesto in 2013 and since then I have tried to do my job (or my passion) following its values and principles. During the latest years I have learned that collaboration between people involved in a project is the best way to build great products and make every member of the team proud of the result achieved.



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dimitri bauwens

dimitri bauwens

Twitter: @dimitribauwens

Dimitri has more then 7 years of experience in the software world. First as a software craftman specialized in the java ecosystem and than evolving into a scrummaster.

As a scrummaster he brings the agile mindset into companies such as Infrabel with the boots in the mud. but also he is getting the Agile bug across the whole organization.

As an organizer of XP days benelux he returns the favor he gets from the community (through various meetups and other conferences) and helps to organize the most awesome xp conference in the benelux



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Ben Linders

Ben Linders

Website: https://www.benlinders.com

Twitter: @BenLinders

Ben Linders is an Independent Consultant in Agile, Lean, Quality and Continuous Improvement, based in The Netherlands. Author of Getting Value out of Agile Retrospectives, Waardevolle Agile Retrospectives, What Drives Quality and Continuous Improvement. Creator of the Agile Self-assessment Game.

As an adviser, coach, and trainer he helps organizations by deploying effective software development and management practices. He focuses on continuous improvement, collaboration and communication, and professional development, to deliver business value to customers.

Ben is an active member of networks on Agile, Lean and Quality, and a frequent speaker and writer. He shares his experience in a bilingual blog (Dutch and English), as an editor for Culture and Methods at InfoQ and as an expert in communities like Computable, Quora, DZone, and TechTarget. Follow him on Twitter: @BenLinders.



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Marc Evers

Marc Evers

Website: http://www.qwan.eu

Twitter: @marcevers

Marc works as an independent coach, trainer and consultant in the field of (agile) software development and software processes. Marc develops true learning organizations that focus on continuous reflection and improvement: apply, inspect, adapt.

Marc organizes workshops and conferences on agile and lean software development, extreme programming, systems thinking, theory of constraints, and effective communication. Marc is co-founder of the Agile Open and XP Days Benelux conferences.

He knows how to combine his real-world experience with knowledge that is out there to create novel solutions. He likes to add games to highly-rated workshops, so participants have fun and learn from experience.



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Willem van den Ende



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Philippe Bourgau

Philippe Bourgau

Website: http://philippe.bourgau.net

Twitter: @pbourgau

Sustainable productivity coach and developer.

I help development teams to attain sustainable productivity by adapting eXtreme Programming to their context and special difficulties.



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Xavier Rene-Corail

Website: http://lgtm.com

Twitter: @XCorail

Software developer for more than 20 years. I lived several lives, as developer, manager, large scale agile coach, architect of a complete offshore software factory, agile transformation agent …

I am now working at Semmle, the company behind http://lgtm.com, discovering new ways of doing agile development thanks to code analysis.



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Koen De keersmaecker

Koen De keersmaecker

Website: http://www.bizzuals.com

Twitter: @KDekeersmaecker

Koen De keersmaecker is a visual facilitator, visual trainer and visual coach. He is founder of Bizzuals, a visual incubator that empowers people and organisations to think with the pen. His main observation is “People think they understand each other, but in reality they don’t.”

As bikablo® certified global trainer, he trains and coaches people and teams in the bikablo® visualization technique — a technique which improves learning, knowledge transfer, dialogue and collaboration.

Over the last 10 years , he has been working as a pragmatic “Enterprise Lean-Agile Coach”, supporting companies big and small in their improvement journeys in immer changing markets, be it adoption Agile mindset or thriving as a start -up.

Today his passion is exploring new techniques and methods for inspiring people and how to make their messages stick.

He lives with his wife and 2 sons in Antwerp.



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[email protected]



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Johan Decoster

Johan Decoster

Website: http://www.ilean.be

Twitter: @johan_decoster

Johan is a consultant, coach and trainer and is always learning and exploring the realm of personal and organisational development. He supports organisations and teams creating better results with participatory leadership approaches, collaborative practices and creative processes.

As a structural thinker he helps to unlock everyone’s unique potential and create the structures that allow people and organisations to make clear choices and create the outcomes they really want.

He is a practitioner of the next organisational paradigms that have self-organisation and wholeness at their center.



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Nicole Belilos

Nicole Belilos

Website: http://www.nicolebelilos.com

Twitter: @nicolebelilos

I am an independent Agile coach and Certified Scrum Trainer (CST), with over 13 years experience in the Agile world. I help organizations, teams and individuals on their journey to Agility.

With an education in Mathematics and Computer Science, I started my career as a programmer in the waterfall world. In 2004 I was introduced to Scrum and the Agile mindset. From then on, I have been an enthusiastic adept of Agile.

I strongly believe in (continuous) learning. I like to teach and share knowledge, and I frequently speak at international conferences. I am also strongly involved as a volunteer in the Agile community.

My hobbies are singing and acting. In my training and coaching work, I frequently add improvisation and role-playing aspects.



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Sandra Warmolts

Sandra Warmolts

Website: http://www.warmolts-ict.nl

Twitter: @sannygr

Sandra works as an independent agile coach, trainer and scrum master with companies with large software and product development. Mainly in the Northern part of Holland.

After work she loves to play tennis, go out for dinner and spend time with her kids (15 and 14).



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Jan-Willem Zijlstra

Jan-Willem Zijlstra has been an Agile enthousiast for ten years. Starting as a project leader using RUP and transferring to an Agile coach helping teams to become a team and combining work pleasure with productivity. Jan-Willem converts his knowledge of Agile, Scrum, Kanban, LeSS and SAFe into practical use for teams and the organisation.

In private life Jan-Willem loves to travel, every holiday is to another destination (it used to be every holiday to a new country, but that's a thing of the past), in the weekends Jan-Willem enjoys riding his mountainbike in the Dutch woods, the more mud the better.



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Participants

Jan
Jan

Jan has been working as a programmer for 5 years now. Jan loves to program. He knows a lot of languages, and a lot of tools. At work, he he is not always happy because the circumstances often force him to deliver the quality he knows he can reach. Jan explores new technologies and trends on the internet and in books and magazines. At night Jan contributes to an open source project together with 10 other guys, from all over the world. That's where he heard about agile methodologies. In the open source group, he is used to work with unit tests, but he hopes to get some real in-depth tips and tricks from experts at the XP Days conference. He is also interested to learn about the latest trends for continuous intergration tools and test automation.

Meet Jan at the following sessions

Marieke
Marieke

Marieke is part of a team that delivers product software on a regular basis. Several months ago, her team had an introductory training on extreme programming and scrum. Some of the ideas she learned about seemed interesting enough, but she is not sure if this methodology is applicable in their particular situation. After the course, some of her colleagues started to write unit tests, but there still are only a few, and they are not run very often, as far as Marieke can see. They also started to do a daily standup meeting, because according to the trainers that is a tool to enhance communication within the team. But these meetings are rather boring, and they tend to take 1/2 hour, every day. Team members are grumbling about wasting their time.

Marieke started to think all this agile stuff is only an unusable hype. But then she heard about XP Days, and she thought "well, let's give it another chance, if 150 people go to this conference, for 11 years in a row now, maybe there is more to it". She hopes she can hear from real people in real teams how they have applied these techniques, which problems occurred in their situation, and what kind of consequences that had for them.

Meet Marieke at the following sessions

Leo
Leo

Leo has been around forever. He has seen everything, done everything. Over the years, Leo has been working as a developer, as a project lead, as a tester, as an analyst, as a manager, and as a consultant. He knows from experience that everything comes back, if you only wait a few years. He has learned that the same problems and the same solutions have been invented and re-invented a hundred times in computer science. He has lived through the rise and fall of uncountable new technologies and methodogies. All of them brand new, all of them the one and only forever best way to make software. Leo wants to go to XP Days because he thinks it's an excellent opportunity to meet with a lot of young, smart and enthusiastic people.

Meet Leo at the following sessions

Bram
Bram

Bram has never missed an XP Days. He has been to several other conferences in Europe, and also attended quite a few bigger agile and other conferences. Bram likes the XP Days, because of the friendly and informal atmosphere. Every year he goes back to work from XP Days full of energy, with a bag full of new ideas and techniques.

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Philippe
Philippe

Philippe comes to XP Days because his boss told him to go. He has never heard about this agile stuff. He doesn't know what it is, or what it can be used for. He guesses it is something his boss wants to buy. He doesn't really care, because going to this conference means that he will be away from the hectic chaos in the office for 2 days.

mmm I think maybe it is not very useful for Philippe to come to the XP Days? -Vera

Why not? Let Philippe come, let him relax and have a beer and dinner with agile people. He might even attend some presentations. And, once he's relaxed, who knows what could happen? –Pascal

Meet Philippe at the following sessions

Georges
Georges

Georges is a project manager. His life is filled with stress, deadlines, difficult programmers, unhappy customers and demanding bosses. Sometimes he wonders if he's chosen the right career.

Lately, Georges has been hearing more and more about agile methods. Some of his ex-colleagues have converted from project management to agile coaching. They tell him tales of vibrant, exciting, fun projects where customers and developers live in perfect harmony. That can't be true. They must be exaggerating. Or are they….?

Meet Georges at the following sessions

Vincent
Vincent

Vincent is the IT manager of a large company. His teams don't do too badly. Some projects are allright; some don't fully satisfy their users. The CEO has asked him to propose a plan to increase the efficiency of his department by 10% in the next two years. So, Vincent looks around for solutions that might help him to create and implement the plan. He has looked at a lot of things: processes, tools, consultants… He's heard that some other companies (even some reputable companies) have had success with "agile" methods, so he comes to the XP Days to get a taste of what "agile" can offer him. He doesn't know what to expect. Hippy surfer dudes? 18 year old wizz kids with piercings? Greybearded hackers? Oh well… What does he have to lose?

Meet Vincent at the following sessions

Joke
Joke

Joke is a product manager for a succesful product company. Joke understands her customers needs, she has lots of ideas for new features that would enhance the product. She knows that this product really enhances its user's lives. That's one of the reasons her company is so succesful. But they have trouble keeping up with customer demand. Joke finds it hard to talk to the development team, to make them understand what she needs in the product. If only she and the development team could work together more efficiently, they could make this product make more of a difference. Maybe this "agile" stuff can help? How does product management work in agile projects? Joke hopes to meet some developers and other product managers who can help her and give her some tips.

Meet Joke at the following sessions

Hank
Hank

Hank is a motivated and experienced software engineer cum system architect who spends his days knee deep in the quagmires of enterprise automation. Appalled and bemused by the shocking waste of time, money, and people, he does his best to bring the joy back in the life of those around him by introducing agile methodologies wherever he sees the opportunity. Hank comes to the XP Days to share with and learn from like-minded colleagues.

Meet Hank at the following sessions

Ellen
Ellen

Ellen is an agile coach. She's been using agile methods for a few years now. XP, SCRUM, Lean… it doesn't matter much to her. She's more interested in doing things that matter to deliver value for her customers. She wants to work with a happy team, doing meaningful work.

Ellen wants to learn new ideas and share experience of techniques that work. She comes to XP Days because of its friendly and collaborative atmosphere.

Meet Ellen at the following sessions